FMI

 
Failure Mode Identifiers (FMI) are used to communicate what the ECU has detected, not the root cause of the problem. For example 100-03 “Engine Oil Pressure: Voltage above normal”. The system detected that the signal voltage from this sensor input went above the valid voltage range. The root cause can be an open circuit, a short to a power source, a failed sensor, etc. In every case, refer to the troubleshooting guide for the specific product and the ways to determine the root cause.
FMI “Failure Description”
00 “Data valid but above normal operating range”
01 “Data valid but below normal operating range”
02 “Data erratic, intermittent or incorrect”
03 “Voltage above normal”
04 “Voltage below normal”
05 “Current below normal”
06 “Current above normal”
07 “Mechanical system not responding properly”
08 “Abnormal frequency, pulse width, or period”
09 “Abnormal update rate”
10 “Abnormal rate of change”
11 “Failure mode not identifiable”
12 “Bad device or component”
13 “Out of calibration”
14 “Special Instruction”
19 “Received Network Data in Error”
FMI 00 “Data valid but above normal operational range”. If an
input is still functioning in the valid range but the input is sending a
signal that is above the acceptable limit of the parameter, an FMI 00
code will be generated. On Cat Data Link events are normally used for
this condition.FMI 01 “Data valid but below normal operational
range”. An input that is still functioning in the valid range but
sending a signal below the acceptable limit of the parameter will cause
the FMI 01 code. On Cat Data Link events are normally used for this
condition.

FMI 02 “Data erratic, intermittent, or incorrect”.
Erratic or intermittent data includes all measurements that change at a
rate that is not considered possible in the real world condition and
must be caused by improper operation of the measuring device or the
connection to the module. Signal data from a component is present, at
least intermittently. The signal is either unstable or invalid as
recognized by the control doing diagnostics. Data can be correct
sometimes and not at other times. FMI 02 is also used for data that is
invalid, such as an invalid state of a parity switch.

Note: This
is different from FMI 10. FMI 02 is used for situations where the rate
of change is not physically possible. FMI 10 is used for situations
where the rate of change is physically possible, but outside the
predefined limits of a properly functioning system.

FMI 03 “Voltage
above normal”. FMI 03 occurs when the voltage reading from the
identified circuit is above the valid range. FMI 03 most often relates
to a signal circuit.

FMI 04 “Voltage below normal”. FMI 04 occurs
when the voltage reading from the identified circuit is below the valid
range. FMI 04 most often relates to a signal circuit.

FMI
05 “Current below normal”. FMI 05 occurs when the current through the
identified circuit is below the valid range. FMI 05 most often relates
to a driver circuit.

FMI 06 “Current above normal”. FMI 06 occurs
when the current through the identified circuit is above the valid
range. FMI 06 most often relates to a driver circuit.

FMI
07 “Mechanical system not responding properly”. FMI 07 occurs when an
electronic control sends an electrical command to a mechanical system
and the result is not within the acceptable range. An example of FMI 07
occurs when the ICM transmission (EPTC II) is shifting slowly as a
result of a sluggish solenoid valve.

FMI 08 “Abnormal frequency,
pulse width, or period”. FMI 08 occurs when a frequency of the signal or
the pulse width of the signal is not within the range that is expected.

Note: The period is the time in seconds for one cycle at a specific frequency.

FMI
09 “Abnormal update rate”. FMI 09 pertains to the communication between
the electronic controls on the data link. FMI 09 occurs when an
electronic control is not able to receive any information from another
electronic control, when the electronic control expects to receive
information.

FMI 10 “Abnormal rate of change”. FMI 10 relates to a
signal that changes too fast or too slow. The rate of change is outside
of the expected limit, but possible in the real world.

FMI
11 “Failure mode not identifiable”. FMI 11 occurs when the electronic
control identifies more than one FMI as being responsible for a single
problem, or when the failure mode does not properly fit into any other
FMI.

FMI 12 “Bad device or component”. FMI 12 occurs when a smart device (such as an ECU) has determined it has failed.

Note: In the past, FMI 12 had also been used to describe the following conditions:

  • An electronic control sends a signal to another electronic module
    over a data link. The electronic control expects a response but the
    electronic control receives no response or an incorrect response.
  • An electronic control expects to receive information on a
    continuing basis from another electronic module over a data link, but
    not all expected information is received.

FMI 13 “Out of calibration”. FMI 13 occurs when calibration is
required. Either the calibration has never been performed or the system
has gone out of calibration.

FMI 14 “Special Instruction”. FMI 14 is used when a special procedure or more detailed information is required to understand it.

FMI
19 “Received Network Data in Error”. FMI 19 is associated with network
data that is received. The component that is used to measure the real
world signal is wired directly to the module that is sourcing the data
to the network. The module that is receiving the data via the network is
receiving the information with an error indicator, and not the actual
data.

Leave a Reply